10 April 2007

What would Remnick do?

As you can tell by the previous post, New Yorker-philes, I'm reading Gigi Mahon's "The Last Days of The New Yorker." I need something while I'm jonesing: I left the latest issue of the magazine in Waterhouse's car on the way out to PoCo and I'm three days from a new one in the mail.

The book, as you'd expect, refers to the magazine frequently. There's a quirk of capitalization, however: Mahon capitalizes the "the" only when citing the name of the magazine by itself.
At The New Yorker there was mixed reaction to the news.
They discussed the New Yorker's business prospects.
He presided over a New Yorker annual meeting.
He was leaving The New Yorker to take a job at Hearst.
I have to admit, I'd never thought about the article this way. I'd always assumed it was ponce and chauvinism that compelled The New York Times or The Economist to uppercase the "the." Of course, I'd never seen nine permutations of a journal title on the same page of text before.

Is this the way you wield the article, or is it just a thing between Mahon and her editor?

(JJB Photo: "Sinkmaster.")

2 comments:

zp said...

What do you know?

I feel that this issue bears on the bloggy abbreviation for TNY. Sometimes the abbreviation bugs me (in cases where I wouldn't capitalize the The if I were writing it out) and sometimes the abbreviation really works for me. I guess I'm with Mahon, then. Sometimes The is part of the magazines name and should be capitalized, sometimes it's not.

Strange, but I think the most common abbreviation for the New York Times is NYT not TNYT!! Or am I not reading the right blogs?

JJB said...

Yes, my commenter, you are reading the right blogs.

I have to agree with you on using TNY. I usually feel smacked around by the T, although before this comment of yours I'd never wondered whether people who use 'TNY' use an article before it -- the TNY. No, they can't.

A Google of NYT gets you the stock price for The New York Times Company (ba, still don't like it), then the site itself. 'TNY' gets you something about oxides.